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Best & Fun Things To Do + Places To Visit In Myanmar. #Top Attractions

Best & Fun Things To Do + Places To Visit In Myanmar. #Top Attractions

Considering a trip to Myanmar? If you’re looking for the top attractions and fun things to do in Myanmar, then look no further than Myanmar. Scroll down, and you’ll find our top travel suggestions for Myanmar for the best places to visit in Myanmar. Wondrous Drifter is a Web 3.0 travel startup with ambitious goals to change the world.

Bagan

 Bagan, Myanmar

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The jaw-dropping ruins of this location make you envision Myanmar at its prime.

The Kingdom of Pagan’s capital had Buddhist temples; about 100 of them, pagodas and stupas during its peak around the 12th century. Natural calamities and armies of Mongols eventually destroyed the city, terrorizing the city’s Buddhist residents.

Countless temples and pagodas have fallen on their own weight or been destroyed throughout the years, leaving just well over around 2,000 for them standing today. This, however, has had little effect on the city’s magnificence.

Surviving temples are almost impossibly elaborate, arising out of the dense greenery. The structures that erupted from the fields appear to be the work of a long-forgotten civilization. 

Old Bagan is the finest spot to stay in the area. With the current rush of travelers, new hotels are springing up in Nyaung-U and New Bagan.

A great way to explore Bagan is on foot, providing an amazing view of its old city, but the best way to see the ruins is through a hot air balloon. Visitors can take balloon trips where they can see hundreds of temples in one go.

Walk around or float through the clouds, just make sure you experience seeing Bagan when in Myanmar.

Address: Old Bagan, Myanmar (Burma)

Bogyoke Aung San Market

Bogyoke Aung San Market , Myanmar

Bogyoke Aung San Market , Myanmar / yisris / Flickr

This place would make you experience the city’s daily life.

The market that is highly recommended for visitors to experience is Bogyoke Aung San (Scott Market). The market is considered a significant marketplace in central Yangon’s Pabedan township. The market’s layout is known for its cobblestone streets.

You’ll get lost in lots of shops showcasing Burmese handicrafts, jewelry, souvenirs, works of art, and clothing if you visit Bogyoke Aung San. 

This market is noted for being a prominent black-market currency exchange destination.

The market’s new wing houses businesses that sell medication, food, apparel, and imported goods. It’s also where you can buy popular Burmese products such as Shan paper umbrellas and longyi in Yangon.

Don’t miss this fantastic opportunity to try on a longyi. This can be purchased here on the market. In Myanmar, it’s such a lovely thing to do. Walking through Myanmar would reveal that everyone, both men and women, old and young, wealthy and poor, wears the same skirt-like garment.

Come and stroll through this expansive market now.

Address: Bo Gyoke Rd, Pabedan, Myanmar (Burma)

Boulder Island 

Boulder Island , Myanmar

Boulder Island , Myanmar / XPinger (Chris Sutton) / Flickr

An island that’s said to have inspired the Lostboys’ home, Neverland.

Nga Khin Nyo Gyee Island, also known as “Boulder Island,” is the Mergui Archipelago’s most secluded and far-flung island, notable for a bizarrely positioned spherical boulder on the top of another rock off of the edge of the bay.

 The famed balancing rock lies on a tidal ledge amidst a coral reef garden in the appropriately named Boulder Bay. White sands spread across the bay between the rocky headlands, creating a picturesque tropical island setting.

There are around 800 islands in the Mergui Archipelago, which were only lately exposed to visitors, they were formerly the realm of pirates, and the archipelago has endured looting and destruction throughout its history.

The archipelago is currently considered a popular diving destination, there, you will see amazing aquatic wildlife like whale sharks, sharks, and dugongs. Boulder Island is the archipelago’s most remote island, which could explain the claim of it being the island that may have sparked J.M. Barrie’s fictional faraway island of Neverland. Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie

On Boulder Island, a few eco-resorts have lately emerged, they offer low-impact, highly immersed experiences, including conservation programs highlighting the island’s unique nature.

Address: Boulder Bay, Nga Khin Nyo Gyee Island, Myanmar (Burma)

Hpa-An

Hpa-An, Myanmar

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Backpackers would surely love this location.

The little town of Hpa-An is around 170 kilometers east of Yangon. It is only recently gaining popularity among backpackers.

Climbing Mount Zwegabin, which has a monastery and a magnificent golden pagoda at the summit, is one of the greatest things to do in Hpa-An. Visitors were once permitted to stay the evening at the monastery, sleeping on a mat amongst the monks. However, this practice is now completely prohibited.

Because the hike is challenging, particularly because of the heat, it is advisable to begin early in the morning. If you take the “scenic path” from Lumbini Garden and then the quicker but steeper way back down, expect to spend around three hours ascending to the top. 

Anticipate your knees to be sore for a few days afterward. A restaurant on the site sells snacks, some vegetarian food, and also drinks.

During your stay, there are a few excellent day outings that aren’t nearly as strenuous. For a small charge, you may rent a motorcycle or hire your own driver to bring you, then wait while you tour each of the caves.

Come and visit Hpa-An now and climb Mount Zwegabin for picturesque views.

Address: Hpa-an, Myanmar (Burma)

Hot Air Balloon Over Bagan

Hot Air Balloon Over Bagan , Myanmar

Hot Air Balloon Over Bagan, Myanmar / indigoMood / Flickr

It’s up, up, and away you go, see amazing sites with this hot-air balloon ride.

Enjoy a dawn hot air balloon ride over Bagan’s temples, with breathtaking sights of the countless ancient pagodas and ruins that adorn this lonely wilderness. 

For roughly 40 minutes, you’ll be soaring above Bagan’s ancient temples and pagodas, led by an expert team.

Bagan comes alive in the morning light, highlighting the exquisite temples also stupas, each of which is unique. 

When you first see these ancient ruins, which stretch all throughout the bank of the Irrawaddy River, it’s a genuinely amazing experience. This is the finest method to enjoy this archaeological marvel. 

The tour includes a pre-dawn pick-up from your accommodation, a hot cup of coffee or tea while awaiting the balloon to be inflated, as well as croissants and a glass of champagne after the flight. The cost can be quite high, but the experience is wonderful and well worth it.

Come and visit now to have the opportunity of a lifetime to see spectacular views over the clouds.

Address: Bagan, Myanmar (Burma)

Hsinbyume Pagoda

Hsinbyume Pagoda, Myanmar

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Myanmar’s counterpart to India’s Taj Mahal.

If India is famed for its exquisite symbol of love, the Taj Mahal. Myanmar equals the Hsinbyume Pagoda to that, which is truly a labor of love. 

The pagoda could be found on the western side of the Irrawaddy River, just on the north side of Mingun in the Sagaing Region. 

Princess Hsinbyume or Princess White Elephant was Bagyidaw’s first consort and cousin, who died during childbirth, to whom this temple is dedicated.

The pagoda follows Burmese pagoda architectural principles and is based on accounts of Meru Mountain’s fabled Sulamani pagoda. The great white stupa is bordered on all sides by several wave-like terraces.

People stepping across the wave-like walls of the Hsinbyume Pagoda for the ultimate Instagram photo have recently acquired attention. Burmese folks, on the other hand, would never step onto the temple walls in a million years. Neither should you. Without disrespecting the site, you can still take a great image here.

Make sure to check out this beautiful white structure when in Myanmar.

Address: 3248+8JR, Min Kun, Myanmar (Burma)

Inle Lake

Inle Lake, Myanmar

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One of the country’s most iconic attractions.

Bagan is around 210 miles to the west of Inle Lake. And the lake is most likely one of Myanmar’s most famed tourist destinations.

Some men paddle fishing boats on the lake with their feet. Although it is currently primarily performed as a tourist attraction, it is still quite a feat of balance. If you take any images, expect to offer them a little tip.

Around 70,000 indigenous Intha people still live on the lake, living in floating homes and tending to their floating gardens. Hiring a personal boat driver for the day is the most preferred activity in the area. They can bring you on a tour of the lake and its surroundings. 

There is no need to plan your journey because your boat captain will bring you to all of the major attractions of the area. However, for the finest light, leave before sunrise.

If you have some spare time at Inle Lake, consider taking a cooking class or renting a bicycle. Alternatively, take a scenic drive around the countryside. A notable stopover along the road is the Red Mountain Winery. The place you’re staying at may be able to assist you with a map and information on some of the featured attractions in the area.

Make sure to take a trip down this lovely lake on your next trip to Myanmar.

Address: Inle Lake, Myanmar (Burma)

Inwa

Inwa, Myanmar

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The former capital of Burma was called the “City of Gems.”

Inwa served as the capital of consecutive Burmese kingdoms for 360 years, spanning five centuries. Then earthquakes devastated the town in 1839, and it were abandoned shortly after.

Inwa, spelled Innwa sometimes, was created in 1365 and is recognized locally as Awa or even Ava. In classical Pali, it is known as Ratanapura or the “City of Gems.” Inwa was constructed to be the capital of a reunified kingdom that later became called, suitably enough, the Kingdom of Ava.

 It was built at the convergence of the Myitnge and Irrawaddy Rivers on an artificial island created by a canal linking the two upriver from their natural meeting point. 

It stayed for 190 years as a seat of the head of state for Upper Burma, but it was also considered the center for the thriving Burmese literature of that time period.

The historic imperial metropolis is now predominantly rural with palace structures, pagodas, monasteries, and large city walls that formerly resembled the shape of a lion in a sitting position. One of the monasteries, Bagaya Kyaung, a colossal teak-made structure, is still being used as a school and monastery today. Horse-drawn cart tours of the site are offered by local guides.

When in Myanmar, make sure to visit this former capital.

Address: Inwa, Myanmar (Burma) 

Kakku Pagodas

Kakku Pagodas, Myanmar

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This temple is a hidden gem of Myanmar.

A unique option is what the Kakku Pagoda offers due to the numerous temples found throughout Southeast Asia. It requires dedication and some time to visit this wonderful sight.

While the majority of Kakku’s stupas are from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the largest is thought to date all the way to the twelfth century, when the King of Bagan, Alaungsithu, was building his empire’s sacred monuments. 

Since then, two separate architectural concepts have resulted in a forest of needle stick pagodas that number up to 2,478 that reach out to form Buddha’s footprint.

Visitors are limited because of its remoteness and position inside the Shan State, though the government has built a reflecting pool for photography enjoyment. 

Fortunately, unlike some other more well-known temples, there’s no need to queue for hours to acquire that gorgeous shot.

This unique temple complex is a definite must-see now.

Address: Unnamed Road, Myanmar (Burma)

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Mandalay Palace

Mandalay Palace , Myanmar

Mandalay Palace, Myanmar / Paul Arps / Flickr

This was the last royal palace of Burmese Monarchs.

The last Burmese dynasty’s last royal palace was the Mandalay Palace, constructed between 1857 and 1859. 

It was a part of Mindon’s establishment of Mandalay as the new royal capital city. Built inside a walled fort, the complex has a moat, following the typical palace design.

You will notice the prevalence of gold as you wander through the palace. The element of gold has a significant impact on Burmese religious life and their culture. The throne room is pretty basic, with deep crimson and gold as the main colors.

Although the majority of the complex was built to the original plan, modern materials such as concrete and iron were utilized throughout the reconstruction over the years.

However, the usage of modern components is subtle and blends very well with the existing structures.

Make sure you visit the lovely Mandalay palace on your next journey to Myanmar.

Address: Mandalay Palace, Mandalay, Myanmar (Burma)

Mingun Pagoda

Mingun Pagoda, Myanmar

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This site holds the record of being “the biggest pile of bricks in the world.”

The Pahtodawgyi, which was supposed to be a stupa that’s 500 feet high, containing Buddhist relics, is still incomplete but nonetheless an impressive building. 

It makes the surrounding landscape seem small since it measures an astounding 450 x 450 feet and stands 172 feet tall. Had King Bodawpaya completed it, it would have certainly equaled the scale of the Great Pyramid of Giza.

In 1790, its building began primarily with slave labor and resulted in a significant strain on local resources and personnel. The project was unpopular with the public, which some believe contributed to its demise.

A superstitious man, King Bodawpaya was given a prediction that the finishing of the enormous stupa would result in his death or the country’s downfall. The king stalled the stupa’s construction, fearful of losing his empire. When he died, the project was entirely abandoned.

Despite the stupa’s lack of completion, work on a bell that was to accompany it was completed and was just as grand in size. The finished bell is 12 feet tall and weighs approximately 200,000 pounds. Because the gigantic bell has no inner ringing mechanism, it can only be rung by striking it from the outside.

Check out this uniquely beautiful pile of bricks now.

Address: Mingun, Min Kun, Myanmar (Burma)

Mount Kyaiktiyo and The Golden Rock

Mount Kyaiktiyo and The Golden Rock, Myanmar

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A gravity-defying rock is said to be the most sacred site in all of the country. 

Visitors have been pilgrimaging the Kyaiktiyo Pagoda for generations to meditate and make sacrifices to the Buddha, despite its risky location on the edge of a cliff.

It’s unknown whether this devotion protects the rock from tumbling down the cliff, but the stone that is gold-leaf covered indeed impresses those who come to see it. 

This golden boulder found in Mon State, Myanmar, stands 25 feet tall and 50 feet around.

According to myth, it was the Buddha himself who gave a Buddhist hermit a strand of hair, who then gifted it to the king. Because of that, a boulder shaped like a hermit’s head was presented by the monarch and it was said that they utilized magical powers to draw it from the sea. 

On top of the rock, the king constructed a little pagoda to set down the Buddha’s hair forever, and visitors have pilgrimaged to the location since then.

Address: Mount Kyaiktiyo, Myanmar

Mrauk U

Mrauk U, Myanmar

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See beautiful pagodas in this more serene location.

This city used to be the capital of the first Arakanese Dynasty. Myanmar’s second most famed archaeological site is comparable to Bagan but without the crowds, is called Mrauk U.

Because it is located in the northern Rakhine State, it is also much harder to reach.

Bagan and Mrauk U differ not just in terms of the shortage of visitors but also in terms of the pagodas. To withstand strong winds, those within Mrauk U have sturdy stone walls rather than brick ones. Compared to the ones in Bagan, they’re also newer and smaller.

The landscapes of the two are also distinct. Between the historic pagodas in Mrauk U are little villages, rice farms, and numerous grazing animals. 

You’ll almost certainly have the entire big space to yourself here without the feeling of the hustle and bustle of a more crowded city like Bagan.

Don’t forget to take a trip to Mrauk U for a different experience of Myanmar.

Address: Mrauk U, Myanmar (Burma)

Myeik

Myeik, Myanmar

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An archipelago that was an important port century back.

Located on a peninsula in the Andaman Sea is Myeik. Myeik became a significant global port about 500 years ago, thanks to its location nearly midway between China and the Middle East, as well as the safe harbor provided by the peninsula and surrounding islands.

A diverse community has emerged due to the lengthy trading history, with descendants of Indian Muslims and Chinese traders joining the Bamar, Moken, and Mon (sea nomadic tribes). 

Grand Sino-Portuguese houses stand shoulder to shoulder with traditional wooden residences, colonial-era estates, churches, and mosques to form a medley of architectural styles. 

Myeik remains a busy port today. It is now home to fishermen of the booming fishing industry and known as the center of the country’s pearl industry.

Given its location, the town is also considered the gateway into the 800 different islands of the archipelago of Myeik. Take a boat from the main island to the archipelago’s more northern islands, where you may roam free along uninhabited white sandy beaches and tropical reefs.

Come to Myanmar now, this diverse town is a must-visit.

Address: Myeik, Tanintharyi, Myanmar (Burma)

Ngapali Beach

Ngapali Beach , Myanmar

Ngapali Beach, Myanmar / Dumphasizer / Flickr

A beach lovers’ haven with fairy-tale-like sunsets.

Ngapali is Myanmar’s most well-known beach escape, with plenty of lodging and dining options available to fit any budget. There are a number of beautiful cottages that open directly onto the beach. 

Spend your time by the pool or by the beach relaxing. The best seafood in the country is also found here. In the evenings, dine on the freshest catches of the day while enjoying the view of the sun setting at one of the many eateries. 

When you’ve had your fill of lazing, hire a guide and boat to take you spearfishing or snorkeling. You’re going to have to get up early in the morning, they have all of the necessary equipment provided. 

There isn’t a need for a wetsuit because of the warm water. When you catch something if you spearfish, many seaside restaurants can cook it up and serve it for you with delicious sides!

Come and visit during the Ngapali Thadingyut Festival of Lights. You’ll get to see that all of the pagodas there are lit up with tons of candles, and the streets get their fill of fireworks.

Soak in the sun and eat some fresh seafood at this beautiful beach.

Address: Ngapali Beach, Myanmar (Burma) 

Ngwe Saung Beach

Ngwe Saung Beach, Myanmar

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With the finest white sand and gorgeous turquoise blue waters, what’s not to love?

Explore one of the country’s prides, the Ngwe Saung Beach, to round off your journey to Myanmar. The turquoise waters and pure fine white sand of this unspoiled beach are the perfect mixes to chill after a long day of travel.

This beach provides far more than only views, as you can observe islanders going about their daily lives. In the midst of a rapidly increasing tourist area, their genuine way of life is a sight to behold, as it demonstrates their commitment to preserving their traditions and culture.

There are several hotels, guest homes, and eateries providing authentic Myanmarese cuisine on this lovely beach, so you won’t be worried about finding a place to stay or eat.

Several prawns and fish businesses are based here. There are also small souvenir shops selling lovely local crafts that are the outcome of the villagers’ hard work and passion.

Surely, you will definitely enjoy the products. It would be fantastic if you chose to buy some local souvenirs from the vendors because you will be helping them make an income.

Put your swimsuit on and enjoy the great things this beach has to offer now.

Address: Ngwe Saung Beach, Myanmar (Burma)

Snake Pagoda 

Snake Pagoda, Myanmar

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In a place where snakes are considered sacred, it’s no surprise Myanmar has a Snake Pagoda.

The giant serpents that dwell blissfully curled around a Buddha statue within this pagoda nearby Mandalay are known as Hmwe Paya, or in English, “Snake Pagoda.”

When the temple was founded in 1974 by a Buddhist monk who was caring for the old pagoda. The monk discovered two enormous snakes slithering around a Buddha statue inside. 

After taking the snakes to the jungle, the monk returned to tidy the pagoda. But, the snakes were back in a day, and a third had even accompanied them. The snakes would again be taken out to the jungle, but then they’d return each time. The monks eventually began to believe that the snakes were holy, potentially reborn monks’ souls.

The temple is visited by thousands of devotees each year, and the pagoda’s walls are lined with photographs of families admiring these semi-holy serpents. They have not been known to bite anyone at all and appear to enjoy being petted by tourists.

The Snake Pagoda’s surrounding area is particularly worth visiting, as it contains many neglected yet lovely ruins that tourists rarely visit.

See these friendly snakes now at the Snake Pagoda when in Myanmar.

Address: Kyaukse, Myanmar (Burma)

U Bein Bridge

U Bein Bridge, Myanmar

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Who knew a rickety bridge could have some royal history?

The U Bein Bridge, which spans the Tanungthaman Lake, may appear to be just another creaky wooden bridge (it is, though), but it is actually created off of the remnants of a royal palace.

After around three years of building, the wooden bridge was finished in 1851. The bridge has a little curvature to it and is sustained by hundreds, maybe a thousand wooden pillars driven into the tiny lake’s bottom. 

The teak planks that form the bridge’s surface were salvaged from the ruins of a palace in Inwa, a former capital of Burma that had been demolished several times. 

Its history is regal, even if the resulting bridge may not appear to be. 

The bridge became one of the country’s most recognized and famous tourist sites. It’s especially spectacular in the evening when the sunset colors illuminate the scene in vibrant hues.

Stroll through this surely unique bridge now.

Address: Mandalay, Myanmar (Burma) 

Win Sein Taw Ya

Win Sein Taw Ya, Myanmar

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It’s known globally as the most massive reclining Buddha.

The world’s biggest reclining Buddha is called Win Sein Taw Ya. It stands 30 meters tall and 180 meters long and is visible from kilometers away. 

The reclining Buddha could be found across from the Buddhist shrine of Kyauktalon Taung and contains chambers with the Buddha’s teachings, showcased in dioramas and a shrine. 

It’s important to note that, although the strange wonder of strolling into a big head, this giant Buddha is still considered a holy place, don’t forget to take your shoes off before entering the holy site.

The reclining Buddha has still not been finished even after over 15 years of construction. 

Works for a second reclining Buddha opposite the original have been well under work since 2012, with the goal of being designed to last since the first one’s construction was poorly done. 

Check out this huge Buddha statue now when you come to Myanmar.

Address: Mawlamyine, Myanmar (Burma)

Yangon

Yangon, Myanmar

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A city of Myanmar that has evolved through the centuries.

Yangon (previously called Rangoon) is Myanmar’s largest city. It is also the one that has mostly evolved since the country’s borders were opened to foreigners. 

All around the city, rooftop bars, boutique hotels, and culinary delights are springing up. It is also the favored location for foreigners to settle because it is a commercial hub. The largest international airport in Myanmar can be found here.

When in Yangon, three days is enough time with plenty of time to visit the city’s highlights. However, you could find yourself wanting to remain longer. 

Spend a night roaming the grounds of the Shwedagon Pagoda. Not only because of how lovely it looks during the evening, but also because you won’t have to think about burning the bottom of your feet on the pavement from the sun’s heat.

Make a point of spending a night on 19th Street which is Chinatown. It’s the neighborhood hangout for inexpensive but great street food and some draft beer.

Yangon is a must-visit for those wishing to come to Myanmar. What are you waiting for, come now?

You haven’t made up your mind to go to Myanmar yet, have you? Check out reasons to visit Myanmar at least once in your lifetime here.

Address: Yangon, Myanmar (Burma)