Skip to Content

Best & Fun Things To Do + Places To Visit In Bordeaux, France. #Top Attractions

Best & Fun Things To Do + Places To Visit In Bordeaux, France. #Top Attractions

In the process of making overseas trip arrangements? A trip to Bordeaux, France, is something you should absolutely do. For the best things to do in Bordeaux, France, and the coolest places to visit in Bordeaux, France. Scroll down for our top travel recommendations in Bordeaux, France. Wondrous Drifter is a Web 3.0 travel startup with ambitious goals to change the world.

Bordeaux

Bordeaux, France

Bordeaux is one of the best places to go in France

Located in the heart of France’s grape-growing region, this riverbank city is a popular destination for wine and culinary lovers.

Bordeaux, situated in the southwest of France, is undoubtedly well-known around the globe for its high-quality wines. On either aspect, it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site because of its numerous historical structures.

When you think about Bordeaux, the first thing that comes to mind is wine. As the center of a region home to some of the world’s oldest vineyards and best wines, it’s little wonder the city has 60 appellations and 7,000 winemakers.

Remember that Paris isn’t necessarily better than other cities and that rural towns aren’t always uninteresting. The city of Bordeaux has a charming ambiance. But there’s more to come.

There is indeed a great see and do in and around Bordeaux. There are a plethora of stunning day trips to choose from.

Wineries, of course, but also charming villages and stunning natural scenery are all within easy driving distance.

The beautiful city is a must-see! Whatever your taste in wine, you’ll like this city. It has a lot to offer, particularly in terms of tourist attractions!

Bordeaux Wine

Bordeaux Wine / Árpád Czapp / Unsplash

Bordeaux’s wine region is inextricably linked to the city’s history and renown as the world’s oldest and most famous wine-growing region.

You are invited to explore this wonderful region by Bordeaux, which serves as the starting point for your journey into the vineyards.

Bordeaux has the world’s most extensive quality wine vineyards. It’s possible to produce a wide range of wines because of the several wine-growing areas, including reds, whites, rosés, light reds, and sparkling wines.

The critical stops along the Bordeaux Wine Route are located in these wine districts. About 6,000 old mansions, medieval towns, archeological monuments, and ancient Roman churches amid the Bordeaux vineyards.

Several of the world’s most known châteaux open their doors to the public for outdoor tastings during the year’s warm months.

Vineyard owners invite the public to their properties for events, including wine tastings, wine classes, and other culinary and cultural explorations.

Are you curious about how the most outstanding wine is made and what it tastes like since it is known as the best wines? Try it for yourself to see if it’s true!

Address: Bordeaux, France

Basilique Saint-Seurin

Basilique Saint-Seurin, Bordeaux, France

Basilique Saint-Seurin is one of the best places to go in Bordeaux, France

The Romanesque remains and the stunning stained-glass windows make for an exciting tour of the most 19th-century construction.

The Basilique Saint-Seurin is located near Place des Martyrs de la Resistance, a public park. Despite its urban address, the church itself is one of Paris’ oldest structures.

This beautiful church’s UNESCO World Heritage Site status is because it was a pilgrimage destination on the ancient Way of Saint James.

Built mainly around the 12th century in the Romanesque style. The buildings along the pilgrimage way to Santiago de Compostela, the basilica, are still used today.

An elegant stall and stone abbot’s chair were added to the choir in the 14th century.

Also, a Virgin Mary statue and beautiful Gothic reredos (decorative screens) decorate the choir chapel.

The 11th bell tower is the oldest element of the basilica. Relics from the 6th and 7th centuries can be found in the crypt, and also sarcophagi that date back to the same period.

The Basilique buildings in Bordeaux are another reason to visit France. This is a must-see for sure!

Address: Pl. des Martyrs de la Résistance, 33000 Bordeaux, France

Basilique Saint Michel

Basilique Saint Michel

Basilique Saint Michel / Matt Kieffer / Flickr

An archangel-dedicated basilica in medieval design overlooks this city.

Saint-Michel is the city’s most vibrant and bright area.

UNESCO has recognized the Basilique Saint-Michael as a World Heritage Site. This church’s bell tower, which is entirely separate from the main structure, is a work of art.

The basilica was constructed around the 14th to the 16th century.

It displays beautiful Flamboyant Gothic architectural components throughout its 200-year construction span.

Located in Place Canteloup, the basilica’s freestanding 15th-century bell tower.

Because it serves as a church tower, the 114-meter-high structure is affectionately referred to as La Flèche or The Spire.

In the Quartier Saint-Michel, visitors will find a vibrant and multicultural atmosphere (neighborhood).

For centuries, Bordelais poets like Meste Verdié and Ulysse Despaux have taken advantage of a lively, natural environment every Monday and Saturday around the spire.

Singing, card games, and drinking at many cabarets serving the day’s specialty cocktails are available here. Take advantage of this opportunity for yet another mind-blowing experience!

Address: 33800 Bordeaux, France

Cathédrale Saint-André

Cathédrale Saint-André

Cathédrale Saint-André / Anthony Persegol / Unsplash

Bordeaux’s most stunning religious monument is right next to the city hall.

The Cathédrale Saint-freestanding André’s belfry is housed in this ornate tower.

The tower was erected in the 15th century by Archbishop Pey Berland. Its intricate decorations, sky-soaring spires, and angled corner buttresses exemplify Flamboyant Gothic architecture.

A 19th-century statue of Notre Dame d’Aquitaine graces the tower’s summit as a more recent addition. The 1853 tenor bell in the church’s bell tower weighs 11 tons.

The Pey-Berland Tower, available to the public Tuesday through Sunday, has an observation platform that visitors may climb.

There are 229 stairs to climb to reach the tower’s 50-meter summit.

Climbing is a must-do activity. To get to the summit, it’s a matter of climbing 282. Tour Pey Berland’s tower is a great site to gaze out over the city, as well.

Address: Pl. Pey Berland, 33000 Bordeaux, France

Canelés

Canelés

Canelés / Jojo Yuen / Unsplash

Bordeaux’s most famous dessert has been delighting gourmets for decades, The cannelé (often spelled canelé).

Flour, milk, eggs, sugar, butter, vanilla, and rum mix in these little cakes, easily identified by their crusty outside and soft center.

Rich and elegant, Bordelaise cuisine has its own distinct identity within France.

You might order a steak with Bordelaise sauce created with red wine, fried shallots, and demi-glace to get you started.

Canelés, a little pastry cooked in a scalloped mold with vanilla, rum, and cane sugar, is the Bordeaux delicacy that jumps to mind when people imagine Bordeaux.

After dinner, their finest is served as a dessert with tea or champagne. Canelés make great presents because they come in a box and are easily transported.

People who love chocolate will be delighted by the abundance of local craftspeople. To ensure that you’re getting the real deal, ensure that the sweets are created on-site (or in a nearby workshop) and not just resold.

They may be found in practically every bakery and pastry store. Make sure you get the ones with a well-caramelized golden brown crust!

Address: Bordeaux, France

Esplanade des Quinconces

Esplanade des Quinconces

Esplanade des Quinconces / Fred Romero / Flickr

With the iconic monument created for the Girondins, this is also the most recognized place in the city and the most symbolic of the French Revolution in Bordeaux.

The Esplanade des Quinconces, a large public park in central Bordeaux, is a peaceful haven just a few streets from Le Grand-Théâtre. An idyllic waterfront setting, flanked by the Quai Louis XVIII and the Seine, is provided by this esplanade.

This 12-hectare area, situated beside the river, is the biggest in Europe. Planting trees in staggered rows is referred to as quinconces.

It is commonly utilized as a venue for various events due to its large size.

During Euro 2016, it served as a “fan zone,” complete with bars and a massive screen, for events such as concerts and fairs.

With a column topped by a figure of liberty and bronze horses galloping at the base, the Monument aux Girondins has become a famous picture location.

On your first visit, make a wish and toss a coin! You never know if you’ll come back one day. Because of its stunning architecture, this place is a must-see for tourists.

Address: Place des Quinconces, Bordeaux

Jardin Public

Jardin Public

Jardin Public, Bordeaux / Alberto Cruz / Flickr

A famous park area in the city’s heart is known for its exotic flora and attractive water features.

It opened in 1746. A green place was provided to the Bordelaise to improve their well-being, keeping with the humanist ideals of the 18th century.

There is a museum, a library, a children’s theater, and a café with outdoor dining in this park’s green spaces. The park is a beautiful place to go for a jog, a stroll, or sit back and relax.

The gardens were built in 1746 and modeled by Versailles’s André le Nôtre designer’s original plans. 

Nature conservation and public enjoyment are the primary goals of the park today, which also serves as a habitat for rare and endangered plants.

The botanical gardens are home to over 3,000 plants, many of which thrive around lakes and ponds. Ducks and swans can be spotted in these ponds.

Bring your family and enjoy a picnic in the open grassy spaces or choose a bench in the shade behind the colorful trees. You may also take a break near the winding river that flows along the park’s northern border.

Address: Cr de Verdun, 33000 Bordeaux, France

La Cité du Vin

La Cité du Vin

La Cité du Vin / Matt Kieffer / Flickr

Renowned as the world’s foremost wine museum, La Cité du Vin, focuses on wine’s worldwide, living legacy.

This approach to wine is exclusively available at La Cité du Vin, the world’s only cultural institution that does so. People with impairments, families, and visitors from across the globe are all welcome here.

When it comes to the history and production of wine, it’s a state-of-the-art museum that will educate you on the subject.

Promote an atmosphere where wine-related sensory experiences are the primary focus of this museum.

To highlight the universal, cultural, and symbolic function wine plays in many civilizations.

The façade of this architectural masterpiece, which is situated on the banks of the Garonne River, is breathtaking.

With 10 hours of multimedia entertainment, you could quickly fill a day here with oenophiles. Visit this site if you’re interested in learning more about Bordeaux’s wine and culture.

Address: 134 Quai de Bacalan, 33300 Bordeaux, France

La Grosse Cloche

La Grosse Cloche

La Grosse Cloche / patrick janicek / Flickr

The Grosse Cloche is one of France’s oldest belfries in the city’s center.

In addition to being the finest bell tower in France, this tower was formerly used as a prison.

La Grosse Cloche, Bordeaux’s medieval town hall belfry, was constructed through the 15th century that featured twin conical roofs.

Located atop the ruins of the 13th-century Porte Saint-Éloy, a former gate in the city’s historic fortifications, a few vestiges of the medieval era are left in the town.

A ten-centimeter-thick door was used to separate a tiny prison for juvenile offenders from the rest of the city beyond this gate.

The 13th-century Porte Saint-Éloi entrance provided access to the city’s core.

An angry king took the bell in the belfry in 1548 after it was erected in the 15th century.

Moreover, the bell, which goes back to 1775 and weighs 7,750 tons, can be seen below.

Grosse Cloche is a ghost town for most of the year, save for major public events like Bastille Day.

Even though the bell doesn’t ring much, it is a dramatic sight for visitors to the city’s center. A visit here is a must-do!

Address: Rue Saint-James, 33000 Bordeaux, France

We don’t travel to get away from life but rather to ensure that it doesn’t pass us by. Get ready to explore the world. Kick off your world travel by checking out our traveling the world guide. When you explore the world, you have to go to the USA. Click here for the beautiful states to visit in USA.

Le Grand-Théâtre

Le Grand-Théâtre, Bordeaux, France

Le Grand-Théâtre is one of the best places to go in Bordeaux, France

Bordeaux’s harmonious neoclassical style, this magnificent theater is the city’s most iconic structure.

The Grand Theater, erected in 1780 by architect Victor Louis, is widely considered his finest work.

In the heart of the stunning place de la Comédie, the Grand-Théatre is the focal point of city activity and the original location of the Roman Forum.

The Palais-Royal and the Théâtre de la Comédie-Française in Paris were created by Victor Louis in the late 18th century.

Corinthian columns depicting the nine muses and the goddesses Juno, Venus, and Minerva, adorn the outside of the temple.

The theater’s beautiful foyers inspired the Paris Opera House’s grand stairway.

Charles Garnier designed Paris’s original Paris Opera House. The luxurious ambiance is further enhanced with a 400-light crystal chandelier.

Do you wish to keep yourself engaged while traveling? Attending a ballet, opera, or music concert is the best way to see the Grand Theater.

The Bordeaux National Opera’s performances are unquestionably the most fantastic way to appreciate this magnificent structure.

Address: Pl. de la Comédie, 33000 Bordeaux, France

Musée d’Aquitaine

Musée d’Aquitaine, Bordeaux, France

Musée d’Aquitaine is one of the best places to go in Bordeaux, France

Outside of Paris, the museum is also known as the biggest of its kind. It performs a tough job of capturing the history of the Aquitaine region over several centuries.

It is possible to learn about the history of Bordeaux and the Aquitaine area by visiting the Museum of Aquitaine.

The Laussel Venus, a 25,000-year-old item, Gallic gold coins from the 2nd century BC, and a 3rd-century figure of Hercules all reside in the museum.

The tomb of Michel de Montaigne from the 16th century and a statue of a knight of Curton from the 13th century are two more notable items in the collection.

The statue of Montaigne previously stood at the museum’s entrance, and visitors would “absorb” the great man’s wisdom by touching the statue’s foot.

The Laussel Venus, a realistic stone carving of a lady that is 27,000 years old, will have you reeling.

Don’t miss the chance of few items in the galleries, even if one has just a few minutes. Gifts and publications are available for purchase at the museum store.

Address: 20 Cr Pasteur, 33000 Bordeaux, France

Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux

Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux

Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux is one of the best places to go in Bordeaux, France

It displays works by well-known European painters and local artists from a variety of generations and schools.

The Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux (Museum of Fine Arts) occupies part of the Hôtel de Ville in Bordeaux’s enormous Jardin de la Mairie park, which is replete with statues and formal gardens (Town Hall).

An extensive collection of paintings, sculptures, and sketches from the 15th to the 20th century is displayed in the museum.

Titian, Veronese, Rubens, Van Dyck, Delacroix, Matisse, and Picasso are the masters represented in the museum’s permanent collection.

By date and country (e.g., Renaissance, 17th-century Dutch still-life paintings, French classicism of the 17th and early 18th centuries), artworks are classified thematically.

Other temporary displays include British art from the Louvre Museum and landscape paintings between 1750 and 1900. sketches by Goya show an interest in physiognomy and art depicting liberty from the Enlightenment to the Romantic period.

The museum store, where you may purchase postcards, posters, and other mementos, makes this a must-see. There is no café in the museum.

However, there are park seats in the Jardin de la Mairie where you may have a picnic.

Address: 20 Cr d’Albret, 33000 Bordeaux, France

Place de la Bourse

Place de la Bourse

Place de la Bourse, Bordeaux / Bob Familiar / Flickr

The gorgeous center square, which is lit at night to offer a lovely background for Holiday selfies, is one of the town’s most identifiable characteristics.

This plaza is a well-known example of 18th-century classical French architecture.

In the 1720s, Bordeaux’s medieval town walls were demolished to make way for this grand square on the left side of the Garonne.

It was planned by Jacques Gabriel, a favorite of Louis XV’s, and the plaza quickly became a symbol for the city.

Beveled corners, wrought iron constructions, and ornate faces are all examples of Louis XV’s top architect’s style, known as macarons on the surrounding buildings.

Also, you’ll want to cross the street and visit Michel Corajoud’s Water Mirror, a landscape art installation. Reflecting Place de la Bourse, it’s a vast pool with only a thin layer of water, occasionally obscured by mist.

Take a picture in this magnificent cobbled plaza, surrounded by stunning buildings and features a lovely fountain in the middle.

Address: 33000 Bordeaux, France

Porte Cailhau

Porte Cailhau

Porte Cailhau / Hervé Simon / Flickr

A landmark with a distinguished past provides a stunning vantage point from which to take in the city of Bordeaux, Porte Cailhau.

Since its construction, this magnificent structure has remained essentially the same. It was erected in honor of Charles VIII’s victory at Fornovo (Italy).

This 35-meter-high city entrance might be a little Renaissance chateau, complete with witch-hat towers and castle-like windows staring over the river above the Gothic gateway, thanks to the French campaign in Italy.

Visitors to the tower are reminded of Charles VIII’s tragic death by a sign that points out that he fell to his death after stepping into a lintel, depicted on the tower’s riverside.

King Charles VIII’s success against the Republic of Venice at the War of Fornovo was remembered by its building in 1495.

On its first level, the history and art of stonemasonry are explained in a tiny museum. The rooftop glimpses of the river and the city are next to none.

Check over Bordeaux’s lovely city from atop a Renaissance château ambiance for an unforgettable Bordeaux experience. This is your opportunity to witness it firsthand. 

Address: Pl. du Palais, 33000 Bordeaux, France

Porte Cailhau

Porte Cailhau

Porte Cailhau / Hervé Simon / Flickr

A landmark with a distinguished past provides a stunning vantage point from which to take in the city of Bordeaux, Porte Cailhau.

Since its construction, this magnificent structure has remained essentially the same. It was erected in honor of Charles VIII’s victory at Fornovo (Italy).

This 35-meter-high city entrance might be a little Renaissance chateau, complete with witch-hat towers and castle-like windows staring over the river above the Gothic gateway, thanks to the French campaign in Italy.

Visitors to the tower are reminded of Charles VIII’s tragic death by a sign that points out that he fell to his death after stepping into a lintel, depicted on the tower’s riverside.

King Charles VIII’s success against the Republic of Venice at the War of Fornovo was remembered by its building in 1495.

On its first level, the history and art of stonemasonry are explained in a tiny museum. The rooftop glimpses of the river and the city are next to none.

Check over Bordeaux’s lovely city from atop a Renaissance château ambiance for an unforgettable Bordeaux experience. This is your opportunity to witness it firsthand. 

Address: Pl. du Palais, 33000 Bordeaux, France

Place de la Victoire

Place de la Victoire

Place de la Victoire, Bordeaux / Patrice CALATAYU / Flickr

The city’s most popular plaza for people-watching is crammed with students sipping cocktails on the expansive cafe terraces.

Place de la Victoire to Place de la Comédie is Bordeaux’s longest pedestrian thoroughfare, running for 1.2 kilometers from Place de la Victoire to Place de la Comédie, and the Porte d’Aquitaine rises towering at the foot of the main commercial strip rue Ste-Catherine.

The Colonne de la Victoire, a marble obelisk by Ivan Theimer, lies under the artwork (2005). As a tribute to the Bordelais wine tradition, both paintings include grapes.

Two-story townhouses from the 18th century line the square’s perimeter. A triumphal arch, also constructed in the 1700s, sits where a city gate formerly stood.

The symbols on the column depict mythology and the history of wine, with a particular focus on Bordeaux. Both engraved and bas-relief versions of these designs are made in bronze.

Symbolizing the vine as a creeper, the column has a helical curve with a stone and metal capital on top.

A bronze tortoise next to the column that kids will love to climb on, so bring them along!

Address: 33000 Bordeaux, France

Pont Jacques Chaban-Delmas

Pont Jacques Chaban-Delmas

Pont Jacques Chaban-Delmas / John Cameron / Unsplash

Modern and stylish, the tallest lift bridge in Europe is in Bordeaux.

The Jacques Chaban-Delmas bridge, an architectural marvel, is a beautiful representation of today’s technological know-how. Its flowing lines blend in seamlessly with the quays and its surroundings.

The bridge is an excellent example of a well-balanced technological and aesthetic design. It gives the city’s urban growth a much-needed contemporary flair.

This is the sixth bridge over the Garonne, sandwiched between the Pont d’Aquitaine and the Pont de Pierre. As the tallest lift bridge in France, it is also the tallest lift bridge on the whole continent!

For photographers and Bordelais alike, the bridge is lit at night. It adds yet another gorgeous element to Port-de-Moon. When the tide is high, the pylons are blue, and when it is low, they are green.

The city operates boats as part of its public transportation system, and seeing the bridge from the sea is thrilling.

Despite its newness, it blends in with the city’s traditional architecture, making it a triumph of engineering and aesthetics.

Visiting Bordeaux isn’t complete without a stop at the bridge. It is the most significant part of a nighttime stroll around the quays!

Address: Pont Jacques Chaban-Delmas, Pont Jacques Chaban Delmas, 33300 Bordeaux, France

Palais Gallien

Palais Gallien

Palais Gallien / Daniel Milner / Flickr

As Bordeaux’s sole surviving Gallo-Roman amphitheater, the Palais Gallien serves as a reminder of the city’s Roman past.

This site offers a look into the lives of the ancients. The Palais Galien, Bordeaux’s most ancient Gallo-Roman relic, is close to the city center.

Burdigala (Bordeaux’s Roman name), at its height, is evoked by the ruins of this amphitheater. Even in the basements of nearby homes, you’ll find a few pieces of the ancient walls and arches that formerly stood there.

Around 20,000 people (more than double the town population) used to sit on wooden seats and watch sports back in the day.

In the 17th century, the Palais Gallien was a haven for criminals and prostitutes. Before it was turned into a quarry, a mayor during the revolutionary era, rumors that the area was a meeting spot for witches.

Spectacular events like gladiator fights and Roman games with live animals were part of the entertainment here.

Apparently, a Roman amphitheater, Palais Gallien, has been the most visited attraction you must see for another entertainment experience.

Address: Bordeaux, France

Rue Sainte-Catherine

Rue Sainte-Catherine

Rue Sainte-Catherine, Bordeaux / Mathieu / Flickr

Bordeaux’s primary retail street is almost a kilometer long and is the city’s oldest street. It is wholly pedestrianized.

The lively Rue Sainte-Catherine is home to several stores and eateries. Flat-screen televisions and Nespresso coffee makers are standard amenities in the hotel’s contemporary guest suites.

It served as a significant north-south thoroughfare under Roman rule. Because it connects the Grand Theater to Place de la Victoire, it is still essential today.

Since the 18th century, the roadway has been known as “Martyr’s Way” in honor of the neighboring church dedicated to the saint.

In February and July, temporary stalls are also set up on the street, making things even more exciting.

Several well-known worldwide brands may be found in the street’s more affluent sections. Still, as you descend, the atmosphere becomes increasingly hipster and free-spirited.

During your shopping spree, you may take a break at many beautiful cafes and marvel at the crowds of people milling around the street.

Address: 33000 Bordeaux, France

Quais de Bordeaux

Quais de Bordeaux

Quais de Bordeaux / www.twin-loc.fr / Flickr

With its gorgeous 18th-century façades and several listed historic buildings, Bordeaux’s quayside ranks as the best attractive waterfront area globally.

Bordeaux’s characteristics are coming together in this section of town to create a new way of living.

Bordelais have made the city’s quays, renovated and revitalized in the 2000s, their preferred place to stroll. 

People come to relax in the sun, run or shop, and spend time with loved ones in the park.

Along with restored 18th-century facades, the quays of Bordeaux may be discovered from the Pont de Pierre to the Bacalan district along the River Garonne. Because of the tram, the bike paths, and the plethora of things to do, it has grown in popularity.

You can’t visit Bordeaux and not wander along the waterfront. Many places to sit and relax have been set up in the shadows of plane trees. 

Many parks and gardens along the Garonne River have become popular places to take a stroll, ride a bike, or simply rest and unwind.

Address: 40-41 Quai des Chartrons, 33000 Bordeaux, France