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Best & Fun Things To Do + Places To Visit In Solomon Islands. #Top Attractions

Best & Fun Things To Do + Places To Visit In Solomon Islands. #Top Attractions

Thinking of going to Solomon Islands for your vacation? Check out the list of the best things to do in Solomon Islands and places to go in Solomon Islands below. As a Web 3.0 travel startup, Wondrous Drifter has big plans to shake things up in the field.

Guadalcanal Island

Guadalcanal Island, Solomon

Bonege Beach, Guadalcanal Island, Solomon Island / Jeremy Weate / Flickr

Guadalcanal has a lot to offer visitors. If you’re looking for an island vacation that’s completely devoid of tourist traps and modernization, this is the place for you!

Divers like to go to Guadalcanal because the water is clear, there is a lot of marine life, and shipwrecks are waiting to be found.

Over 200 kinds of birds may be found on the island, making it a birdwatcher’s paradise. It is not uncommon for visitors to stop in at historic battlefields and museums, as well as traditional performances on Guadalcanal, in order to learn about the island’s rich cultural history.

More than a quarter of the Solomon Islands’ most popular tourist attractions may be found on or around Guadalcanal Island. People interested in history will enjoy visiting both the dramatic US and Japanese Peace Memorials. 

Those who want a somber reminder of the damage the island suffered during World War II may also visit Red Beach, Alligator Creek, and Bloody Ridge, which are all former WWII battlegrounds.

Honiara

Honiara, Solomon Island

Honiara, Solomon Island / Jenny Scott / Flickr

Because it is the city that houses the airport, Honiara, which is the capital of the country, will most likely be your first stop. Guadalcanal has a history since it was the location of important political upheavals during the Second World War. 

As a result, Guadalcanal has a past. The government residence, the national parliament, and the museums are the city’s most popular things to see and do. In addition to those, there is Bonegi Beach, Matanikau Falls, and the wreckage of the Hirokawa Maru.

Honiara may be found on Guadalcanal Island in the Solomon Islands, which may be found on the island’s northwestern shore. From Honiara, ferries travel to several provinces. To call Honiara home would be a gross understatement. 

Its bustling Central Market is known for selling handicrafts in addition to regional food. Traditional frescoes are painted on the building in the shape of a cone that houses the National Parliament.

Visitors to the Solomon Islands may expect to find something for everyone, from history buffs to shopping to thrill-seekers who enjoy water sports.

Rennell Islands

 Rennell Islands, Solomon Islands

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The island of Rennell, located in the Solomon Islands, is a getaway for those not afraid of danger. The most well-known location for vacationers to visit in the Pacific, Lake Tegano is the largest lake in the region and is located in East Rennell, which is on the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. 

The island of Rennell is home to a number of unique species that can only be found there.

The provinces of Rennell and Bellona come together to form the island of Rennell. Due to the fact that it is the world’s second-biggest raised coral atoll, you will get the opportunity to view some of the world’s most unique and endangered indigenous species of flora and wildlife here. 

Because the majority of the island is surrounded by a thick cover of forest, there is a very limited amount of area available for human settlement. You may watch the sun go down over Lake Tagano while also participating in sports such as scuba diving and diving at Kagaba Bay.

Bougainville Island

Bougainville Island, Solomon Islands

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Make your way to Bougainville, a remote island in the South Pacific that is a world apart from the busy beaches of Thailand, Bali, and Indonesia. All throughout Bougainville, the 685km of coastline, secluded paradises are waiting for you to find.

There are several dormant and active volcanoes and wild rivers and waterfalls in Bougainville. It’s not only a beach destination. Bougainville is a natural paradise. It’s very uncommon for these bodies of water to be connected to caverns. One such example is the eerie Eberia cave, which the locals believe is a portal to another realm.

With fewer people than on PNG’s main peninsula, Bougainville’s scenery is frequently cleaner and litter-free. Make your way there quickly before things change!

Tropical rain forests and the blue seas of the Caribbean may be seen in abundance in this area. It is a self-governing territory inside Papua New Guinea, however, it is considered to be a part of the northern Solomon Islands.

In Bougainville, you may go to the beaches of Kangu and Loloho, Mount Balbi, Panguna, and Arawa. These are the areas that are available to visit.

Malaita Island

Malaita Island, Solomon Island

Malaita Island, Solomon Island / Leocadio Sebastian / Flickr

When you visit Malaita, you won’t believe the natural splendor that hasn’t been touched. The river networks and tropical vegetation there have not been altered from their original form. 

Malaita is known for its numerous river systems, springs, high-altitude waterfalls, and canyons, all of which are considered to be among its most noteworthy characteristics. 

The reef island that is located just off the coast of North Malaita may also be visited. The Langa Langa Lagoon is known for having breathtaking sunsets.

Malaita is not only rich in natural wonders that may be discovered but also has a rich cultural history that is as intriguing. It is a rare mix of being an adventurous paradise and a bastion of traditional Melanesian customs and civilizations. The island in question is called Melanesia.

Malaita is a stunningly gorgeous island that is easily accessible from Guadalcanal and features a steep highland interior in addition to narrow coastal plains and hidden harbors. 

Gizo Island

Bougainville Island, Solomon Islands

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Solomon Islands’ third-largest city is Gizo. Compared to the other towns, it has a better infrastructure. Carvings created from stone and wood, as well as woven sacks, baskets, and mats, may be found in the Gizo markets. 3 WWII planes are on display for visitors to see. Activities such as scuba diving are also an option.

Go for a walk along Gizo’s beautiful shoreline. Gizo’s most well-known beach and the village of Saeraghi may be found here. Visit little towns along the journey to get a feel for the traditional way of life that many people continue to adhere to to this very day.

We can make arrangements for birdwatchers who want to observe species that are found only in the Solomon Islands. Ghizo Island and its environs will be the setting for your exploration of the region’s unique wildlife.

Gwaunau’ru, Solomon Islands

Gwaunau’ru, Solomon Islands


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A museum that is maintained and financially supported by the nation’s central government is referred to as a national museum. In many nations, the term “national museum” refers to a museum managed by the national government, as opposed to other museums managed by regional or municipal governments. 

In other nations, the national government is in charge of a significantly more significant percentage of the museums that are located within the country.

The National Museum is located in Honiara, and it is highly recommended that those who are interested in learning much more about the heritage of the Solomon Islands pay a visit there. 

The several wars and other key events, as well as the photographic exhibits that will be on show, will give visitors a better understanding of how the Solomon Islands came to be what they are today. 

Because it is located directly on Honiara’s principal thoroughfare, Mendana Avenue, the National Museum of the Solomon Islands is not hard to discover.

Tenaru Falls

Tenaru Falls, Solomon Islands

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Explore the Guadalcanal Rainforest’s crowning glory, Tenaru Falls, while hiking through kilometers of pristine rainforest. The Solomon Islands, with its stunning coral reefs and active volcanoes, is a natural wonderland. Natural waterfalls may be found on a large number of islands. Imagine diving into a crystal-clear, deep pool after leaping from a waterfall. 

Those who seek this information have found it. Tenaru Falls, a 60-foot-tall waterfall located in Honiara, is a must-see attraction. After a two-hour climb, you’ll find a refreshing pool and a breathtaking panorama that can’t be described. 

An after-work swim in the chilly water below is the perfect way to relax and rejuvenate. Consider recruiting a guide and carrying suitable footwear for the flat, slick trip, which includes multiple river crossings. 

Don’t go with small children. Bring lots of food and drink, and be kind to the residents whose territory you’re passing through. Solomon Island’s Tenaru Falls is only among the many attractions that may be arranged for visitors.

Mataniko Falls

Mataniko Falls, Solomon Islands

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Mataniko Falls is a must-see in Honiara’s hinterlands because of their stunning thundering of water into a deep gorge below. Starting in Lelei hamlet, the journey to these waterfalls is an uphill climb followed by an undulating length among the gently rolling hills.

To get to the bottom of the little canyon where the Mataniko runs, you’ll have to make your way down a muddy route. The return journey takes around two hours. The Mataniko Falls may be seen on Guadalcanal, not far from Honiara, the island’s capital. 

The cascades are two-sided falls that plunge into a breathtaking grotto. On the other hand, the cave and the waterfalls constitute only a small portion of the appeal. 

Japanese troops tried to evade arrest during World War II by sheltering in the cave. It is possible for visitors to go on a self-guided tour within. However, a tourist guide is highly advised.

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Kwaibala Waterfalls

Kwaibala Waterfalls, Solomon Islands

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Kwaibala Waterfalls are stunning waterfalls with enchanting little water pools to cool down during the hot summer months in Kenya. Auki lies only around 1.8 miles away from the popular waterfall of the same name, Kwaibala Falls. 

You may cool yourself in the little ponds that form at the base of these jaw-dropping cascades. Swimming and relaxing at Kwaibala Falls are the pinnacle of any journey to the South Pacific. If these waterfalls aren’t enough for you, the Solomon Islands are home to a plethora of breathtaking caverns. 

Check out the Kwaibala Waterfall, which is about 3 kilometers from the town of Auki. Swimming is encouraged in the little ponds formed by the waterfall. 

A trip to Kwaibala Falls will allow you to enjoy this unique combination of swimming and relaxation. Staggering caverns, many of which are open to the public, are a major draw of the Solomon Islands.

Lilisiana Village

Lilisiana Village, Solomon Islands

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Any traveler interested in the area’s culture should make it a point to stop by the Malaita Island community of Lilisiana, a little fishing village. A mile and a half are all that separates the village from the heart of the Auki township. 

It is well worth the time to investigate this little portion of the island. Visitors will discover houses created traditionally along the coastline, and they will be constructed on long stilts. 

Organizing tours of this town and other communities located all over the island is possible. When traveling to this fascinating region of Malaita Island, visitors are urged to organize themselves into groups of no more than ten people at the most. 

Around one and a half kilometers away from Auki lies the welcoming fishing community of Lilisiana. This town is beautiful to boot, with its cottages built traditionally and perched on platforms over the coast. The tranquil beach of Liliana is a thin strip of golden sand stretching long distances over coral reefs.

Marovo Lagoon

Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Island

Marovo Lagoon, Solomon Islands / Xplore Dive / Flickr

The natural beauty and ecology of Marovo Lagoon, which can sometimes be referred to as “the final frontier of the Pacific” because of its complex and diverse terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, merits the world’s attention. 

The Marovo Lagoon is considered one of the most breathtaking sights in all of the Solomon Islands. This lagoon, which can be found in the vicinity of the New Georgian Islands, is made up entirely of saline water and features many islands with no people living on them. 

As a result of the fact that the lagoon has dozens of excellent diving locations, the vast majority of visitors will choose to participate in diving while they are there. 

Visitors to Marovo Lagoon certainly do not need to get their feet wet to appreciate the breathtaking natural scenery surrounding the lagoon. You may spot spectacular new bird species in every corner of this region.

Many eco-resorts are scattered out between the little islands. Although there are a lot of people, one feels very “separated” from society because of the surroundings.

Skull Island

Skull Island, Solomon Islands

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Skull Island is a tiny atoll located in the Solomon Islands Western Province. The atoll is famous for its quantity of human skulls, thus the island’s name, which translates to “Skull Island.” This eerie yet interesting ritual activity is on exhibit there. 

Headhunting, which refers to the practice of conserving the severed head of an adversary after he or she has been murdered, has a well-documented history in ancient Melanesia. This practice was also common in the Solomon Islands, which are now a nation comprising a group of islands in the South Pacific.

This little islet in Vonavona Lagoon is a sanctuary for the Rendovan leaders’ skulls and the ultimate burial ground for the skulls of many vanquished soldiers. It is a boat journey of thirty minutes from Munda. 

It was in the 1920s that they were made. The skull house is a tiny, triangular-shaped coffin that also stores the chiefs’ clamshell-ring jewels. It was given to them by the ancestors.

Although there are additional islands that contain the remnants of headhunting expeditions, the only one that is available to the public is this overgrown bit of land, and there is a nominal admission charge to pay in order to visit it.

Borare River Cascades

Borare River Cascades, Solomon Islands

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A trip to the Solomon Islands for the sole purpose of going on a hike is an experience that should not be passed up. 

We have activities that are appropriate for people of all fitness levels and lengths of time, ranging from a brisk walk along well-marked paths to a multiday guided trek through the unexplored forest.

On the majority of the hikes available in the Solomon Islands, having a guide at your side is highly advised. A guide will be able to steer you on the best routes and will be updated on the trail conditions. 

Our gorgeous islands are off the usual path, and a tour will be able to show you around. In addition to this, they are able to organize stays in the village and assist in the payment of any fees that are supposed to be paid to native landowners.

This trek will take you around three hours and will take you a few kilometers outside of Honiara. Along the way, you will see a number of little waterfalls that are surrounded by lush vegetation. 

If you plan on going swimming on your trek and know that you will likely get quite wet despite your best efforts to avoid it, don’t forget to bring your swimwear.

Tavanipupu Private Island Resorts

Tavanipupu Private Island Resorts, Solomon Islands

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How many beach resorts throughout the world have had the privilege of welcoming Princess Kate and Prince William, the British royal couple? There is, undoubtedly, a ‘royal’ link. Despite its small size, the barefoot luxury of this resort continues to enthrall couples and families alike.

This quiet beach resort is actually exceptional when celebrity power is removed from the equation. For one thing, it has a very unique definition of what constitutes a five-star hotel.

Tavanipupu Island makes up for the absence of contemporary vices with kilometers of crystal-clear seas where visitors may swim, snorkel, and dive in peace. Many of the Solomon Islands’ hundreds of diving sites may be explored by tourists on bicycles, kayaks, or through the numerous dive charters that operate on the island.

To sum up, this Island Resort is a wonderful place to spend your vacation, where you can have a relaxing vacation while making a lasting impression.

Bellona Island

Bellona Island, Solomon Islands

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A small island in the Solomon Islands, Bellona is part of the country’s newfound independence in 1978. Rennell Island, with which it shares a common culture, language, and ancestry, is just a short boat ride away from here. Both Rennell and Bellona are part of the Solomon Islands’ Rennell and Bellona Province.

Guadalcanal Island is around 180 kilometers southeast of Bellona. Approximately 10 kilometers long and 8 kilometers broad, the island has a population of roughly 2,000 people. The heart of the island, home to the Bellonese, is shielded by towering cliffs and dense forest because of its bowl form.

Bellona is a great place to ride a bicycle. You may also get a bicycle from a rental shop. The airstrip and the opposite end of this Island are only accessible by bicycle if you are staying at a guesthouse or cottages near Bellona’s southern tip. 

Bellona Island’s guesthouses provide mostly local cuisine and seafood to their visitors. If you aren’t interested in sampling the local cuisine, you should carry your own meals with you.

Kennedy Island

Kennedy Island, Solomon Islands

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Take a trip to the Solomon Islands to retrace John F. Kennedy’s journey and see the local culture. Come to Kennedy Island and make up your own tales.

Kennedy Island is an isolated island that was named after John F. Kennedy. The island is also known by its former names, Plum Pudding Island and Kasolo Island. 

After Lieutenant Kennedy was in command of their patrol torpedo boat, which had a collision with a Japanese ship during World War II, the Lieutenant and ten of his crew members were forced to swim to safety in this area.

The island meets all of the requirements: it has perfectly pure water and washes up on a beach of white sand; the air smells like coconut oil and sea salt. Plenty of palm trees give shade from the intense heat of the Pacific sun.

Wreckage divers and WWII history fans go to Kennedy Island, a popular tourist destination for residents and visitors alike. You may retrace JFK’s movements more than a century after he was born. A World War II exhibit devoted to John F. Kennedy may also be seen on Lubaria Island in Rendova.

Vilu War Museum

Vilu War Museum, Solomon Island

Vilu War Museum, Solomon Island / Stefan Krasowski / Flickr

About one kilometer off West Guadalcanal Road, this museum is hidden away in the thick of the surrounding jungle. Driving time from Honolulu to this location is within an hour, and the road, which was recently repaired, is in excellent shape.

It might be difficult to locate the museum. The main road does not have any signs, and the gravel lane that leads to the museum is muddy and covered with tall grasses.

The Vilu War Museum contains memorials for the United States of America, Japan, Australia, Fiji, and New Zealand, as well as the remains of several the United States and Japanese aircraft, such as a Betty bomber and a Lightning fighter.

Veterans of World War Two and anyone with an interest in the war frequently make their way to the museum, which has the potential to become a popular tourist destination. 

Solomon Islands National Museum

Solomon Island National Museum, Solomon Island

Solomon Island National Museum, Solomon Island / Jenny Scott / Flickr

Since its inception in the early 1950s, the National Museum has served as a repository for the country’s history and culture. It is one of the country’s oldest government agencies.

Just off of the main roadway is a group of old wooden buildings. Yes, it’s worth the trip. However, the museum’s exhibitions are well-presented and educational, if a little old. Friendly museum employee on duty who cared about visitors’ experience as much as she did about the museum’s own. 

With its more recent history and a focus on inter-island conflict, the second building provides a more up-to-date look at the causes, consequences, and degrees of peace that have been achieved since the first. 

On display was an insightful look at a time following independence that many people had never heard of before visiting the museum.

A trip to the museum is unquestionably worthwhile. Admission is free, but donations are welcome. The exhibitions focus mostly on Solomon’s history and culture. Artifacts, their uses, and their history are explained in detail on several signboards.

Guadalcanal American Memorial

Guadalcanal American Memorial, Solomon Island

Guadalcanal American Memorial, Solomon Island / 總統府 / Flickr

If you’re visiting the Solomon Islands, this really is undoubtedly a “must-see” sight. It isn’t very big. Even though it isn’t frequented, it’s a beautiful setting and one of Guadalcanal’s most beautiful spots. 

Skyline Ridge is home to the United States War Memorial. The historical events of WWII’s Battle of Guadalcanal are memorialized on the island’s stone walls. A wonderful approach to understanding the American role in WWII. Taxis and minivans are readily available for those who prefer to go on their own.

The monument is understated yet deeply moving. It’s hard to believe that so much blood was shed on this island as it is on many other battlefields.

The plaques detailing the many conflicts that have taken place in the region are quite educational, and the scenery is spectacular. “The Pacific Theater” has been renamed after this conflict, and it tends to put it all into perspective. Go if you’re in Honiara; it’s worth it!

Do you need any more convincing that Solomon Islands is worth a visit? Hop over to reasons to visit Solomon Islands at least once in your lifetime here